Course Overview

This lesson will explore the practices for the four processes of Motivational Interviewing and their reliance on each other. It will also look at different types of interviews and ways of being MI adherent in those scenarios. Multiple opportunities are provided to test your understanding of the information presented throughout this lesson.

  • Duration: 1 hour
  • Credit Hours: MCBAP-R (0.0) MCBAP-S (1.0) Mi-CEC (1.0) Nursing (0.0)
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Topics Covered

How Motivational Interviewing Unfolds

The four processes of Motivational Interview are: Engaging, Focusing, Evoking, Planning. These are a guide for MI and a guide for finding the tasks (the “what.”) we are trying to accomplish. In each process, the strategies (the “how”) and skills (the “OARS”) we have learned come in to use in different ways. The skills are the way we employ the strategies in a manner appropriate to accomplishing the task of each of the processes. We explain in detail how the tasks, strategies, and skills come together through the processes of MI. 

Engaging Process

Engagement is a part of our work start to finish because ruptures in a working relationship are always possible, we always work to stay engaged. Details for the tasks, strategies, and skills, in relation to the practice of engaging, are thoroughly explored. We provide an example of a staff-client dialogue, and an opportunity for you to choose the response to a client statement that would best employ a MI skill to facilitate the strategy of expressing empathy and affirming client strengths in the Engaging Process.

Focusing Process

As we begin to engage a client, issues will emerge in our conversation that give us an indication of how we want to direct and focus the conversation. The Focusing Process sharpens focus by identifying, exploring and enhancing the importance of change for the client, usually by developing discrepancy. Details for the tasks, strategies, and skills, in relation to the practice of focusing, are thoroughly explored. We provide an example of a staff-client dialogue, and an opportunity for you to choose the response to a client statement that would best employ a MI skill to facilitate the strategy of evoking change talk and developing discrepancy in the Focusing Process.

Evoking Process

Evoking is a strategy used throughout all MI processes. The Evoking Process uses evoking to explore and resolve ambivalence about change in a given Focus are. We want to address barriers to change and begin to identify possible action steps a client might be willing to consider. Details for the tasks, strategies, and skills, in relation to the practice of evoking, are thoroughly explored. We provide an example of a staff-client dialogue, and an opportunity for you to choose the response to a client statement that would best employ MI skills to facilitate the strategy of resolving ambivalence and building confidence for change in the Evoking Process.

Planning Process

In the Planning Process we are inviting the client to get specific about the changes they will make by using information gained from the previous processes. We continue to use the previous processes in the Planning Process. Details for the tasks, strategies, and skills, in relation to the practice of planning, are thoroughly explored. We provide an example of a staff-client dialogue, and an opportunity for you to choose the response to a client statement that would best employ MI skills to facilitate the strategy to facilitate the strategies of supporting self-efficacy and consolidate commitment to the Planning Process.

Practicing MI in Different Kinds of Interviews

Motivational Interviewing can be useful in many types of interviewing types and settings. We review how the practice of MI might be adapted in the following types of interviews: Initial Interview/Assessment, Case Planning Interviews with a “Given” Focus, Routine Intervers, and Brief Interviews. We explore each of these types of interviews and look at ways of being MI adherent in these different settings and scenarios. Multiple opportunities are provided for you to test your knowledge on staff responses in different types of interviews and scenarios. 

Additional Considerations

Putting Motivational Interviewing into practice is not a strictly linear process. Moving through the four processes is more of a spiral than a straight line because each process builds off the work from the previous process.


Course Objectives

  1. Describe how MI unfolds by reviewing the Four Processes of MI.
  2. Name and practice strategies and skills relevant to the Engaging process.
  3. Name and practice strategies and skills relevant to the Focusing Process.
  4. Name and practice strategies and skills relevant to the Evoking Process.
  5. Name and practice strategies and skills relevant to the Planning Process.
  6. Review ways to adapt MI to different kinds of interviews.
  7. Explore the utility of MI in situations burdened by time constraints.

What People Are Saying

The module was very informative. It was easy to navigate and thorough in its presentation of the information.

- Brooke C.